Education

UT Dallas Qualifies for State’s ‘Tier One’ Fund

Written by FWD501cReporter

The University of Texas at Dallas announced that it has achieved the critical benchmark criteria required to qualify for funding from the National Research University Fund (NRUF), an exclusive source of research support available to the state’s “emerging research universities.”

UT Dallas qualified for this funding, which this fiscal year totaled $7.5 million, by achieving these Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board’s benchmarks for two consecutive years:

  • $45 million in annual expenditures on restricted research.
  • $400 million endowment.
  • High-achieving freshman class.
  • High-quality faculty.
  • Membership in the Association of Research Libraries, Phi Beta Kappa or equivalent national organization.

“In its short history, The University of Texas at Dallas has set itself apart and earned their reputation as a national leader in research,” Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said in a release. “UT Dallas has generated innovative and groundbreaking discoveries that contribute to our economy and advance Texas as a premier state for higher education. I congratulate UT Dallas for qualifying for the National Research University Fund, and I look forward to all their great work to come.”

UT Dallas is the third emerging research university to meet the NRUF eligibility requirements, after Texas Tech University and the University of Houston.

Read more here.

ABOUT UT DALLAS

Established in 1969, UT Dallas offers top-ranked science, engineering and business programs, and has gained prominence for a breadth of educational paths from audiology to arts and technology. The University enrolls more than 27,600 students — 18,380 undergraduate and 9,250 graduate — and offers a broad array of bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degree programs. UT Dallas’ faculty includes a Nobel laureate, six members of the National Academies and more than 575 tenured and tenure-track professors. Dr. Aziz Sancar, who earned his PhD in molecular and cell biology from UT Dallas in 1977, won the 2015 Nobel Prize in chemistry.

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