Social Justice/Advocacy Social Services

Methodist Justice Ministry receives grant to support abused women, children

Written by Mindia Whittier

The agency is the only pro bono legal organization in Tarrant County that will accept sometimes-complicated cases.

Methodist Justice Ministry (MJM) has been awarded a grant by Texas Women’s Foundation to provide counseling services to women and their children who have been impacted by family violence and abuse.

MJM is a law firm that focuses on a specific need – women and children who are victims of domestic violence, neglect, and abuse. The organization provides free legal representation to ensure children are with a caring and protective caregiver, and that women can lead a life without fear of violence. Its support does not end when a judgment or injunction is issued. Instead, the staff at MJM continue to assist clients as they learn to live a life free of fear, and reconstruct their network and independence.

“The heart of MJM is the counseling services that we provide our clients to help them break the generational cycle of abuse and go on to live a life of independence and stability for themselves and their children,” said Melanie Hanna, Development Director at MJM. “The Texas Women’s Foundation grant will allow us to offer more counseling sessions and enhance our services beyond legal representation of our clients. We are truly grateful for their support”.

Texas Women’s Foundation has been working to build stronger, more equitable communities since 1985, advancing social and economic change for women and girls in Texas. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations, and corporations. These resources support more than $10 million in annual investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through research, advocacy, grants, and programs.

The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls also provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices, and programs in the state.

About the author

Mindia Whittier